SRS logo SRS - News & Events
SRS logo
SRS logo

 

Search SRS

SRS Photographs - Missions


To download a 300 dpi image, select a photo by clicking on the photo or the download link beneath the photo. Once the image appears, right-click on the image and select "save image as" (Netscape) or "save picture as" (Internet Explorer) and save the image to your hard drive. Please note that this is a large, high-resolution file designed to accommodate the electronic image requirements of publications.

Usage Notice: The photographs in this archive are provided courtesy of the U.S. Department of Energy and are provided solely for recognized news organizations, students, partners and vendors to illustrate articles, graphics, editorials or videos that pertain to the Savannah River Site. Other commercial uses are prohibited. Photo manipulation, other than standard resizing, is prohibited.

Defense Waste Processing Facility

Download button
~12 MB

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)
DWPF treats the highly radioactive material by mixing a sand-like borosilicate glass (called "frit") with the waste. The waste/frit mixture is then sent to the plantís 65-ton steel and ceramic melter. In the melter, electricity is used to heat the mixture to nearly 2,100 degrees Fahrenheit until molten. This molten glass-waste mixture is poured into stainless steel canisters to cool and harden. Each canister is 10 feet tall and 2 feet in diameter; it takes approximately 24 hours to fill one canister. A filled DWPF canister weighs about 5,000 pounds. The exterior of each canister is blasted with frit to remove contamination, then welded shut using a current of 250,000 amps applied for 1.5 seconds, while 80,000 pounds of force simultaneously rams a plug into place. The resulting weld is as strong as the three-eighths-inch thick stainless steel canister itself.

Photo: Defense Waste Processing Facility worker

Download button
~12 MB

Remotely Controlled Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Canisters
Scientists have long considered the glassification process, called "vitrification," as the preferred option for immobilizing high-level radioactive liquids into a more stable, manageable form until a federal repository is ready.

RETURN TO TOP

Photo: SRTC research

Download button
~6 MB

Applied Research and Development
The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is recognized as a world-class center of excellence for the development and application of unique and innovative science and technology solutions. These key elements are vital to our customers' success.

Photo:   Moving Spent fuel storage within a Basin

Download button
~4.5 MB

Moving Spent Fuel within a Storage Basin
The Savannah River Site provides for safe receipt and interim storage of irradiated spent nuclear fuel. In the past, spent nuclear fuel was stored in underwater facilities until it was shipped to the siteís canyon facilities for processing. Now, programmatic decisions have been made to discontinue processing in most cases, and develop and implement other methods to treat and dispose of spent nuclear fuel.

RETURN TO TOP

Photo: Plutonium button

Download button
~5 MB

Plutonium "Button"
In the past, solutions transferred from the F Canyon were concentrated and purified in the FB Line. Then, in subsequent operations, the plutonium was precipitated, filtered, dried and finally reduced to metal form, called a button. It is about the size of a hockey puck. Processing equipment is enclosed in gloveboxes so that employees and operating areas are not exposed to the radioactive material. Some operations are automated.

RETURN TO TOP

Photo:  Environmental restoration work

Download button
~7.3 MB

Environmental Restoration
From capping waste sites to installing more efficient groundwater treatment units, the site's program keeps fieldwork-getting the job done-a top priority. The Savannah River Siteís environmental restoration employees achieve cleanup results. The SRS program began in the 1980ís with an inventory of 500 acres of waste sites.

Photo:  Environmental restoration work

Download button
~7.3 MB

Environmental Restoration
Over the years, SRS environmental engineers have worked diligently with the Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control to prioritize and accelerate waste site cleanup activities.

Photo: Use of fiber optics at SRS

Download button
~9.3 MB

Fiber Optic Sensor Technology
More than 10 years ago the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed and installed its first optical sensor system. Today, recognized as a pioneer in sensor technology, SRNL has mastered a broad range of real-time, on-line chemical measuring systems. SRNL's research and technologies enable others to improve quality and operating efficiency, while cutting costs.

RETURN TO TOP

Photo: Pipe crawler robot

Download button
~9.3 MB

Robotic and Remote Systems
The Savannah River National Laboratory designs, develops, fabricates, tests and assists in the installation and field operation of unique equipment systems for use in radioactive, hazardous or inaccessible environments. Products are specifically designed for each application. Examples include special instrumentation for radioactive glovebox operations, radioactive waste tank operations and unique visual inspection/surveillance equipment.

Photo: Use of Environmental
 Biotechnology at SRS

Download button
~9.3 MB

Environmental Biotechnology
The Savannah River National Laboratory has extensive experience in the characterization, development and deployment of bioremediation processes for a wide variety of contaminants which commonly plague our environment.

The bio-analytical capabilities of SRNL provide valuable insight into the control and optimization of these microbial processes. SRNL has earned special recognition, through patents and publications spanning all aspects of scientific, engineering and microbiology fields.

RETURN TO TOP

MEDIA CONTACTS I NEWS RELEASES I SRS NEWS
PHOTOGRAPHS I SPEAKERS I NEWS & EVENTS HOME

SRS HOME I HISTORY I LOCATION I SRS SITE MAP

Last updated: September 9, 2009

DOE Logo DOE-EM logo